Saturday 23 June 2018

Summer Showpieces

St Mary’s Church, Banbury at 7.30pm

  • Ibert – Overture de Fête
  • Sibelius – Violin Concerto performed by Maria Kouznetsova
  • Don Gillis – Symphony No 5½: ‘A Symphony for Fun’
  • Moussorsky – Pictures At An Exhibition

The music of the French composer Jacques Ibert has been described as a combination of ‘tenderness, irony, lyricism, and the burlesque’. Certainly his compositions contain much typical French wit, and we start our concert with his entertaining Overture de Fête.

Jean Sibelius has a different musical outlook, focused heavily on the land and nature of his native Finland. His Violin Concerto is among the most challenging solo parts in the violin repertoire, and we are fortunate to have a fantastic soloist to dazzle us with her virtuosity.

Don Gillis was an American composer of the twentieth century. His best known piece is Symphony 5½, A Symphony for Fun, which is certainly a lot of fun for the orchestra!

Finally, we close our concert with the epic, colourful and demanding Pictures At An Exhibition by Modest Moussorgsky, in the orchestrated version by Maurice Ravel.

Tickets are £10 and 18s and under remain FREE!

Our concert ticket sales have increased since we introduced online ticketing so please book early to avoid disappointment!

Saturday 24 November 2018

Autumn concert

This autumn, the Banbury Symphony Orchestra will perform three romantic orchestral compositions from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Bruckner, Walton and Bruch are the composers for our concert in Deddington Church on 24th November.

Anton Bruckner’s great symphonies are often described as ‘architectural’, arising from the fact that he wrote soaring cathedrals of sound extending over long time spans. We will begin our concert with his early work, the Overture in G Minor, written while Bruckner was continuing to develop his mature later style.

William Walton wrote his Viola Concerto while still only in his twenties. It was an immediate and lasting success in the concert hall, despite the fact that the original dedicatee at first turned it down! The first performance was given by another great composer of the 20th century, Paul Hindemith. The concerto has three movements, unusually starting with a relatively sedate opening movement, before tearing into a faster scherzo movement and finishing with a more conventional allegro finale.

The Symphony No 3 by Max Bruch dates from the 1880s. Bruch was a prolific composer in the German romantic tradition, writing over 200 pieces during his long life. He is best known today for his solo string concertos, such as the Violin Concerto No 1, a concert-hall favourite. The symphony that we play today is in the mould of Brahms, a four-movement work that reflects Bruch’s love for his native Rhineland.

Tickets are £10 and 18s and under remain FREE!

Our concert ticket sales have increased since we introduced online ticketing so please book early to avoid disappointment!